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USA (national)

Missouri State Animal:

Mules - click to see all state animal symbols
Photo of mules from Lake Nowhere Mule and Donkey Farm
(used by permission). See All State Animals - Mammals.

Missouri Mule

See Missouri mule video below

Missouri designated the Missouri mule as the official state animal in 1995. Mules were introduced to Missouri in the 1820s and quickly became popular with farmers and settlers because of their hardy nature. Missouri mules pulled pioneer wagons in the 19th century and played an important role in moving troops and supplies in World Wars I and II. For decades Missouri was the nation's primary mule producer.

Young mules - click to see all state animal symbols
Young mules in morning light - photo by Lake Nowhere Mule and Donkey Farm (used by permission). See All State Animals - Mammals.

What is a Mule?

Mules are hybrids, the offspring of a mare (female horse) and a jack (male donkey). The reverse (the offspring of a male horse and a female donkey) is called a hinny. Mules and hinnies are almost always sterile because the two species have a different number of chromosomes (donkeys have 62 chromosomes, horses have 64).

Percheron mule - click to see all state animal symbols
Percheron mule with only one foot on the ground – this is called a "single-footed" mule (they have a very smooth glide and a four beat lateral gait). Photo by Lake Nowhere Mule and Donkey Farm (used by permission).
See All State Animals - Mammals.

Types of Mules

Today mules are usually divided into two types: “draft mules” and “saddle mules” (there used to be more categories like “sugar mule,” “cotton mule,” etc....but these names disappeared after the early part of the 20th century). Most people now identify a mule by the mother, ie: “Quarter horse mule,” "Tennessee Walking mule,” “Percheron mule,” etc.

Source:
Symbols of Missouri - State Animal - Missouri SOS
The Mule Lady - Lake Nowhere Mule & Donkey Farm
Links:
All State Animals - Mammals


    

 

Missouri Symbols & Icons:

amphibian - insect
animal - horse
aquatic animal  
flower - fish - reptile
bird - game bird
dinosaur - invertebrate
mineral - fossil - rock

flag - seal
motto - holiday
name - nickname
song - instrument
folk dance - dessert
grape - nut
tree - soil - quarter
 

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