State Symbols USA home page

Google

  SITEMAP  

  QUIZ  

Alabama
Alaska
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
Delaware
Florida
Georgia
Hawaii
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New Mexico
New York
North Carolina
North Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina
South Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Vermont
Virginia
Washington
West Virginia
Wisconsin
Wyoming
USA (national)

Alaska State Fish

King salmon - click to see all state fish symbols
King Salmon picture by Robert W. Hines / USFWS. All State Fish Symbols.

King Salmon

See grizzly bears catching salmon video below

The giant king salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) is the state fish of Alaska (also called Chinook salmon, spring salmon, quinnat, tyee, tule, and blackmouth salmon). The king salmon is native to the Pacific coast of North America and is the largest of all Pacific salmon (can reach over 100 pounds).

King salmon hatch in fresh water, spend part of their life in the ocean, then return to the fresh water stream where they were born to spawn (they die after spawning). Some salmon travel more than 2,000 river miles over a 60-day period to reach their home streams. Salmon do not feed during this freshwater migration, and their condition gradually deteriorates as stored body materials are used for energy and the development of reproductive products.

Chinook salmon - click to see all state fish symbols
Chinook salmon by Roger Peters / USFWS. All Fish Symbols.

Each female salmon deposits from 3,000 to 14,000 eggs in several gravel nests. The newly hatched fish live in the gravel for several weeks (until the nourishment in the attached yolk sac is absorbed). Young salmon then consume plankton and later insects until they migrate to the ocean in their second year of life. While at sea salmon feed on a variety of ocean organisms including herring, pilchard, sandlance, squid, and crustaceans. When sexually mature (between 3 - 7 years of age) salmon return to their home fresh water streams to spawn.

Grizzly bears gather at prime fishing spots in Alaska when the salmon run upstream for spawning, putting on a spectacular display catching and feasting on the fish (fat from the salmon helps sustain the bears through the long winter ahead).

Source:
State Symbols: Alaska office of Economic Development
Chinook Salmon: Alaska Department of Fish and Game
Links:
All State Fish & Aquatic Symbols


    

 

Alaska Symbols & Icons:

bird - flower
insect - fish
mammal - dog
marine mammal  
gemstone
mineral - fossil

flag - seal
motto - holidays
language - quarter
name - nickname
song - sport
tree - soil
 

Share |

Grizzly Bears Catching Salmon Video

See more state mammal videos

Alaska Gifts - Gifts by State

Google
What are your State Symbols?
State Symbols USA is a nonprofit organization promoting the conservation
and appreciation of our natural treasures and cultural heritage.